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The Five Muslim Women Achievers You Need to Know About

Five Muslim Women Achievers: This International Women’s Day, Heritage Times wishes to curate a list of important Muslim women who have made significant contributions to society and paved the way for more women to walk into the public sphere.

Saliha Abid Hussain

Saliha Abid Hussain (1913 – 1988) was an Indian writer of Urdu literature. Some of her prominent works are Azra, Rekhta, Yadgaray hali Baat Cheet and Jane Walon ki Yad AtiHai.

Her writing covered several themes, including feminism. Apart from her writings she also spoke against issues like Triple Talaq.

Saliha Abid Hussain
Saliha Abid Hussain

In 1983, she received the fourth highest Indian civilian honour of Padma Shri from the Government of India. Sughra Mehdi’s biography published in 1993 provides more insight into this brilliant woman’s life.

Mofida Ahmed

Mofida Ahmed (1921-2008) was an Indian politician belonging to the Indian National Congress. She was Assam’s first female Member of Parliament, Lok Sabha and also one of the first few Muslim women to be a Member of Parliament in India.

Mofida Ahmed
Mofida Ahmed

She was born in Jorhat Town and pursued her education privately. Later in life, she contributed articles to Assamese journals.

She has worked as Joint Secretary at Red Cross Society, Jorhat during 1946-49 and for the National Savings Scheme in an honorary capacity between 1957-58.

She was the Convener of The Women’s department of the Congress at Golaghat since its inception in 1953 till 1956.

MUSLIM FEMALES IN INDIAN AVIATION

Mumtaz Jahan Haider

Mumtaz Haider was the first principal of the Woman’s College Aligarh. She was also one of the first female student to complete her graduation and post-graduation in English from Lucknow University in 1931.

Mumtaz Jahan Haider
Mumtaz Jahan Haider

After completing a year of teaching at her parental institution, Mumtaz haider proceeded to Leeds in the UK for Bachelor of Education and came back to Aligarh.

She married Hayder Khan, a few decades her senior and head of the Chemistry department, on her own accord in 1935.

She became the Principal of Women’s College in in 1940 and served the cause of education for thirty-one years.

Begum Qudsia Aizaz Rasul

Begum Qudsia Aijaz Rasul (1909 – 2001) was the only Muslim woman in the Constituent Assembly of India that drafted the Constitution of India.

She was one of the few women who successfully contested from a non-reserved seat and was elected to the U.P legislative assembly in 1937, having remained a member until 1952.

Begum Qudsia Aizaz Rasul
Begum Qudsia Aizaz Rasul

From 1937 to 1940, she served as Deputy President of the council. And from 1950 to 1952–54, she was Leader of Opposition. In addition to being the first woman in India, she was also the first Muslim woman in the world to do so.

She became one of 28 Muslim League members elected to the Constituent Assembly of India in 1946. In the Assembly, she was the only Muslim woman.

Begum Aijaz Rasul joined the Congress after the Muslim League in India dissolved in 1950. Between 1952-54 and 1969-1989, she served in the Uttar Pradesh Legislative Assembly as a member of Rajya Sabha.

She also served as Minister for Social Welfare and Minorities between 1969 and 1971. A Padma Bhushan, the third highest civilian award from the Government of India, was awarded to her in 2000.

Salma Begum

Born as Salma Begum in a Muslim family of a small town Dibai, District Bulandshahar in the northern state of India, Uttar Pradesh, she went on to become the first Muslim woman in the world to do her PhD in Sanskrit (1969).

Salma Begum
Salma Begum

Her dissertation thesis in Sanskrit was on the ‘Types of Heroines in Sanskrit Dramas’. After her studies she taught at the Sanskrit Department in Aligarh Muslim University.


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Khadiza Naufa Fatin

Khadiza Naufa Fatin is a History graduate from Jamia Millia Islamia and is currently pursuing her Master's from University of Delhi. She is also part of The Madrasa Discourses project, developed at Notre Dame’s Keough School of Global Affairs USA, under its Contending Modernities Program.